Shaving

ASHLAND -- Daniel Buchter (1852-1942) was 30 years old when he became afflicted with chronic throat problems.

After trying various treatments and remedies, his doctor recommended he let his beard grow.

Buchter came to Ashland in 1872 at the age of 20. He was born on Sept. 26, 1852, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and married Sarah A. Kerr in 1875. They had four children.

Daniel Buchter

Buchter was a shoemaker and worked as a janitor at the Opera House, Masonic Temple, Presbyterian Church and the local library here for years. He was an interesting fellow who may have qualified for the Guinness Book of World records had it existed back then.

According to records, Buchter grew his beard for 43 years and it was the longest beard in Ohio. He kept it pinned to his neck because it extended all the way past his feet. If he didn’t pin it, he would step on it because it was more than six feet long.

Reports indicate the beard actually did cure Buchter’s throat problems.

Buchter sometimes entered beard contests and only displayed the full length of his beard on special occasions. At one time, he was offered a job in a traveling show but he refused.

Poem writing was a favorite pastime of Buchter. He authored hundreds of poems that he kept in several scrapbooks. He also used a pedometer (invented in 1780) to log 3,428 ¾ miles walking to and from work and to church and prayer meetings in 1909.

At the age of 90, Buchter was described as very alert mentally. He had been the tyler (sic) at the Masonic Blue Lodge for six years and was described as a favorite of his Masonic brethren.

On Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1942, Buchter was accidentally struck by a car and killed on East Main Street.

He was transported to Samaritan Hospital by ambulance, but died on the way from a broken neck and other injuries. The umbrella he was carrying on that misty day obstructed his view of traffic.

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