U.S. Homeland Security logo

WOOSTER -- A federal grand jury has returned a three-count indictment charging a Wooster man with firearms violations, including having two illegal components used to turn firearms into fully automatic machine guns.

Kenneth L. McKinley, 31, was indicted on one count each of illegal possession of machine guns, being a prohibited person in possession of ammunition, and receipt and possession of unregistered firearms.

The indictment alleges that McKinley possessed on March 12, 2019 a black Glock-type, select-fire conversion device, with no serial number or manufacturer markings, and a silver Glock-type, select-fire conversion device, with no serial number or manufacturer markings, both and each designed and intended solely and exclusively, for use in converting a weapon into a machinegun.

McKinley was prohibited from having firearms or ammunition because of a misdemeanor conviction for domestic violence in Wayne County Municipal Court, but possessed 50 rounds of Winchester brand, .22 caliber ammunition, according to the indictment.

The indictment alleges McKinley knowingly received and possessed two firearms, those being, a black Glock-type, select-fire conversion device, with no serial number or manufacturer markings, and a silver Glock-type, select-fire conversion device, with no serial number or manufacturer markings, both and each designed and intended solely and exclusively, for use in converting a weapon into a machinegun, not registered to him in the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record.

“In addition to the fact that a convicted domestic abuser is not allowed to have firearms or ammunition, these specific parts are illegal and put the public at risk,” U.S. Attorney Justin Herdman said. “We will work with our law enforcement partners to prosecute all firearms violations, and especially to stop the flow of these parts into the country.”

“The possession of illegal firearms is a violation of federal law and a threat to public safety,” said Jonathan T. McPherson, Special Agent in Charge of ATF’s Columbus Field Division. “ATF will continue to work closely with our law enforcement partners to protect our communities.”

“Keeping weapons out of the wrong hands is critical to keeping our communities safe and to prevent gun violence, we are committed to remaining vigilant to ensure firearms and any firearm parts are acquired while abiding federal laws,” said HSI Acting Special Agent in Charge Angie Salazar.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods, a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. PSN was reinvigorated in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally based strategies to reduce violent crime.

If convicted, the defendant’s sentence will be determined by the Court after review of factors unique to this case, including the defendant’s prior criminal records, if any, the defendant’s role in the offense and the characteristics of the violation. In all cases, the sentence will not exceed the statutory maximum and in most cases it will be less than the maximum.

The investigation preceding the indictment was conducted by the Department of Homeland Security, Homeland Security Investigations and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Damoun Delaviz.